SPCA Rescues 70 Pets in Greenfield

 

On July 23, the SPCA for Monterey County rescued 70 neglected pets from a house in Greenfield.

SPCA Humane Officers responded to a residence on the 300 block of Apple Avenue in Greenfield after receiving a call from the Greenfield Police Department about a suspected hoarding situation. The small house was filled with feces, urine, and thousands of cockroaches. The smell of ammonia from the urine was overwhelming and posed a serious health hazard. Adult Protective Services, Child Protective Services and Monterey County Department of Health are also involved in the investigation. The house has been declared uninhabitable.

The rescued pets, 7 dogs and 63 cats and kittens, were dirty, matted, skinny, severely infested with fleas, and suffering from ear parasites and upper respiratory infections. Many were confined to small cages. One cat was locked in a cage without food, so weak and emaciated he was unable to move. Sadly, due to lack of treatment, many of the illnesses were so severe that after an examination by veterinarians, 26 pets had to be humanely euthanized to end their extreme suffering.

Today, the surviving pets are undergoing thorough veterinary examinations to begin the long road to recovery and adoption.  

This is the seventh large-scale rescue performed by the SPCA this year and the seventeenth since April 2013. During the past year alone, SPCA Humane Officers rescued 637 animals from cruelty and neglect found in these types of situations.

SPCA Humane Investigations officers are still investigating and will submit today’s case to the Monterey County Office of the District Attorney for their consideration of multiple counts of animal abuse under the California State Penal Code. 

How you can help

Donate to help rescue more animals in need
Buy gifts on Amazon for pets rescued by the SPCA
Report animal cruelty and neglect. All reports are confidential 

 

 

$1,000 Reward Offered After Multiple Rabbits Abandoned at Seaside Park

The SPCA for Monterey County is offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who abandoned multiple pet rabbits at Laguna Grande Regional Park in Seaside.

Seaside Animal Control brought ten rabbits found at Laguna Grande Regional Park to the SPCA on July 3rd. The rabbits had been discovered in a box at the park.  On July 8, SPCA Humane Officers returned and rescued eight additional rabbits running loose in the park.

The rabbits are all domestic and tame and would not have survived on their own in the park. They are eight to twelve weeks old with long nails and urine stains consistent with being kept in cages. They appear to be from the same owner.

It is illegal to abandon animals. California State Penal Code 597s states “every person who willfully abandons any animal is guilty of a misdemeanor”. Charges could include a maximum of six months in jail and a fine of $1,000.

The SPCA’s doors are always open to people who need to surrender their animals. Illegally and cruelly abandoning them is never the right decision.

If you have any information about this case, please contact the SPCA at 831-373-2631. All calls are confidential.  You can also report online at www.SPCAmc.org/report-cruelty

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Report animal cruelty and neglect. All reports are confidential

 

 

SPCA Rescues 20 Pets from Filthy House in Pacific Grove

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News Coverage:

On Wednesday, May 7, The SPCA for Monterey County rescued 14 dogs, four young puppies and two cats from shocking, inhumane conditions in a Pacific Grove hoouse.

The small street corner residence was dangerously cluttered with piles of clothing, trash and garbage as well as being  filled with feces and urine.  All 18 dogs, including four very young puppies, were locked in three small back rooms, where the overwhelming stench of ammonia from urine caused difficulty breathing and made humane officers’ eyes burn.  The toxic conditions of the home were so extreme and unsafe that Pacific Grove Fire Department personnel strongly recommended that animal rescuers not return inside the house without protective equipment due to high levels of ammonia gas. During the search of the home some doors had to be forced open by rescuers because they were blocked by deep piles of feces and garbage.

The house, designated as a historic home by the Heritage Society of Pacific Grove, has since been declared uninhabitable.

The rescued pets are suffering from flea infestations, eye discharge, ear infections, hair loss, dental disease, eye trauma, overgrown toenails (one so long it had painfully pierced and was growing into the pad of the foot), and overall lack of care.  Some of the rescued pets are thin and underfed.

Other agencies involved include the Pacific Grove Fire Department, Pacific Grove Police Department, City of Monterey building inspector, and PGPD Code Enforcement officers.

 SPCA Humane Investigations officers are still investigating and will likely submit this sad case to the Monterey County Office of the District Attorney for their consideration of multiple counts of animal neglect under the California State Penal Code.

Learn more about animal hoarding.

How you can help

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Report animal cruelty and neglect. All reports are confidential 

 

SPCA Rescues 14 Dogs and Puppies From Vehicle In Monterey

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News Coverage:

On April 21, the SPCA for Monterey County rescued 14 dogs and puppies from a vehicle parked in Monterey.

The 4 adult dogs and 10 puppies, all pomeranians and chihuahuas, were found stacked in seven tiny filthy crates in a cluttered older model Subaru parked at Virgin Ave and Montecito Ave in Monterey. The dogs were kept as many as four to a crate, and the crates averaged only 20” long by 13” wide by 11” tall in size. The crates were so small that many of the tiny dogs were unable to stand up straight.

When questioned, the owner stated that the SPCA was taking her money and that she could “sell the puppies for $2,000 in Carmel.”

 The dogs and puppies will undergo emergency examinations by SPCA veterinarians, and receive lots of TLC from compassionate SPCA staff.

We are thankful to the many Monterey residents who reported this case and her various locations to the SPCA as the situation was mobile, the suspect had been actively evading humane officers.

When purchasing a puppy, always research the breeder, meet the parents, see where they puppies are raised, and ask for veterinary records so that you do not support neglectful, inhumane breeders. 

Watch video of the rescue here.

How you can help

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Report animal cruelty and neglect. All reports are confidential

SPCA Offers $1,600 Reward After Ducks Shot in Salinas

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The SPCA for Monterey County is offering a $1,000 reward and local donors added an additional $600 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who shot and killed several domestic and federally protected ducks in Salinas.

On April 15, the SPCA received a report that numerous ducks were found dead at the ponds near N. Davis Rd and Calle del Adobe in Salinas. Upon investigation, SPCA Humane Officers discovered 11 deceased ducks and one injured duck. The injured duck, affectionately called Tubby by local employees, had been shot by a pellet gun but is expected to survive after emergency treatment at the SPCA Veterinary Clinic. Tubby was treated for pain and infection and will be housed at the Veterinary Clinic for overnight care and recovery.

X-rays of the deceased ducks revealed that they had also been shot.

At 10:00 pm that night there was a report of people shooting at ducks at the pond near the Courtyard by Marriott on Calle del Adobe. The suspects fled when police responded. Two more injured ducks, a domestic duck named Arnie and a wild mallard, were rescued and are recovering at the SPCA.

If caught, the person responsible could potentially be charged with Penal Code 597 (Animal Cruelty) as well as federal charges for killing birds protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, which established a Federal prohibition to “pursue, hunt, take, capture, kill, attempt to take, capture or kill . . .at any time, or in any manner, any migratory bird, included in the terms of this Convention . . . for the protection of migratory birds.” Three of the deceased birds were mallards, which are on the protected species list.

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SPCA Reward up to $6,000 for Information on Abandoned and Neglected Horse

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Update 4/12/14:

After hearing about this sad case, Animal Legal Defense Fund added $5,000 to the reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for the abandoned horse.  The total reward is now $6,000.

The SPCA for Monterey County is now offering a $6,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who abandoned a horse in Royal Oaks earlier this week.

The horse was first seen walking loose in the area on Sunday, April 6, on the 800 block of San Miguel Canyon Road in Royal Oaks.

Sadly, the horse had to be humanely euthanized on the recommendation of  compassionate equine veterinarians to end his painful suffering from long-term neglect. The horse, a gelding approximately 12-15 years old, was underweight and suffering from a severe, painful leg deformity which was likely caused by a significant, untreated orthopedic injury. He also had severely overgrown hooves that had not been trimmed in several months. He was able to stand but he was in extreme pain and, sadly, had likely been suffering for months.

If you have any information about this case or can identify the horse, please contact the SPCA at 831-373-2631. All calls are confidential.  

If caught, the owners could potentially be charged with the following offenses: California Penal Code Sections 597.1 (Permitting Animals to go Without Veterinary Care), Penal Code 597 (Animal Cruelty), Penal Code 597(b) (Deprivation of Food, Water, and Shelter), and Penal Code 597s (Abandonment).

How you can help

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Report animal cruelty and neglect. All reports are confidential

 

SPCA Rescues 17 Cats and Kittens from Illegal Trailer in Prunedale

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On March 5, SPCA for Monterey County Humane Officers served a search warrant and rescued 10  cats and seven tiny kittens from shocking, inhumane conditions in Prunedale.

The tiny 168 sq ft Terry camping trailer was occupied by a single adult female and almost 20 cats. The trailer is cluttered and covered in feces and urine with an overwhelming smell of ammonia and excrement permeating the space and exterior.  Extremely hazardous and unsafe conditions for the occupant and the cats also included an active sewage leak and a sole source of electricity provided through an extension cord leading to a main residence.

The rescued cats are suffering numerous health issues consistent with hoarding and neglect cases, including eye injuries and infections, upper respiratory infections, and flea infestations. They are painfully matted and covered in filth, as they were unable to clean themselves properly. Thorough veterinary exams will be completed over the next 24 hours.

Other agencies involved include the Monterey County Sheriff’s Department, Adult Protective Services, and Sheriff’s Code Enforcement officers.

This is the seventh large-scale rescue performed recently by your local, independent SPCA. Other recent cases include:

  • Seaside Cat Hoarding, July 2012: 51 adult cats, 113 deceased kittens. Successful conviction.
  • Monterey Animal Hoarding, April 2013: 22 cats, 24 dogs, 7 puppies. Owner pled guilty to charges.
  • St Francis All Creature Rescue & Sanctuary, June 2013: 17 dogs, cats, birds, kittens. Owner pled no contest to charges.
  • Greenfield Animal Hoarding, August 2013: 38 cats and kittens and one hen. Charges have been submitted to the Monterey County Office of the District Attorney.
  • Soledad Animal hoarding, October 2013: 11 dogs and 10 puppies. Charges have been submitted to the Monterey County Office of the District Attorney.
  • Unincorporated Monterey County cat hoarding, November 2013: 18 cats. Charges have been submitted to the Monterey County Office of the District Attorney.

These cases alone involved over 300 pets, not including the animals rescued every day by the SPCA. The SPCA is not a chapter of any other organization and does not receive tax funding. All these rescues are made possible by the generosity of our donors.

SPCA Humane Investigations officers are still investigating and will likely submit today’s case to the Monterey County Office of the District Attorney for their consideration of multiple counts of animal abuse under the California State Penal Code.  

How you can help

Donate to help rescue more animals in need
Buy gifts on Amazon for pets rescued by the SPCA
Report animal cruelty and neglect. All reports are confidential

Reward Offered: SPCA Seeking Person(s) Who Neglected and Abandoned Dog

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Do you recognize this dog? On February 8, the SPCA rescued a severely neglected white pit bull mix from San Juan Rd. in Aromas. The young dog was in horrible condition. It appears that she had been heavily bred and the neglect had been occurring for quite some time. After a careful examination, Veterinarians determined that she was in extreme pain and sadly, due to the severity of her neglect she had to be humanely euthanized in order to end her suffering. 

 

The SPCA is working with Monterey County Animal Services and is offering a $1000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person(s) responsible for severely neglecting and abandoning this helpless dog. 

Click here to view photo (Warning – graphic)

Please help us find the person or persons responsible.

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SPCA Rescues 13 Neglected Cats From Hoarder

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News Coverage

On Thursday November 14, The SPCA for Monterey County rescued 13 neglected young and adult cats from a home in the unincorporated area of Monterey County.  Additional cats were found outside the house and were unable to be rescued at this time.  Many deceased cats were found in the yard surrounding the house. Humane traps will be set in the area to safely capture the additional cats hiding on the property.  

The house was dark, dusty and cluttered with trash.  Most of the home appeared to be without power, requiring rescuers to use flashlights to search the dimly lit interior.  Large plastic storage bins served as litter boxes and have obviously not been cleaned or emptied of feces for a long time.  Furniture and carpets were covered in stains and additional animal feces and urine, causing an overwhelming smell of ammonia and feces to permeate the home.  

The cats are currently undergoing medical evaluation by SPCA veterinarians for a variety of issues commonly found with animals forced to endure unsafe and squalid conditions by their hoarders. 

In addition to The SPCA, the Monterey County Sheriff’s Department, Adult Protective Services and Monterey County Sheriff’s Code Enforcement Officers are also involved in this case. 

How you can help

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Report animal cruelty and neglect. All reports are confidential

 

SPCA Rescues Neglected Cavalier King Charles Spaniels

Update:

The three dogs healthy enough for adoption were adopted into wonderful new homes this weekend. The others are beginning their recovery process in foster homes in the bay area. You can contact www.cavalierrescueusa.org to learn more about them. 

We invite you to sign up for our Pet Alert Program to receive an automatic text or email alert when another Cavalier arrives at our shelter.

We want to thank our supporters who make these rescues possible, our adopters who open their loving arms to pets in need, everyone who reports cruelty and neglect, our volunteers and staff for working tirelessly every day and witness horrors no one should ever have to see, and Cavalier Rescue for helping us with the rescued dogs. We can’t do it without you!

Original Coverage:

On Saturday, October 26, the SPCA for Monterey County rescued eight Cavalier King Charles Spaniels from deplorable conditions in Greenfield.

SPCA Humane Officers received a call following last week’s numerous hoarding case rescue media stories, reporting multiple dogs being housed inhumanely. The house was covered with trash, feces, and miscellaneous items. The smell of ammonia and feces was overwhelming. The house was a place where no human or animal should ever have to live. After meeting with SPCA Humane Officers, the owner agreed to surrender the dogs to the SPCA.

The owner of the dogs was breeding American Kennel Club (AKC) registered dogs and he has a history of selling puppies.  The AKC refuses to release information about the breeder or the rescued dogs to the SPCA without a subpoena.

According to recent news reports, the AKC has nine inspectors country-wide and cannot give accurate percentages of breeders actually inspected. Sadly, this means the health, welfare, quality, and behavior traits as well as the conditions under which a purchased puppy has been raised cannot be guaranteed by AKC papers alone.  The SPCA strongly advises anyone considering purchasing a puppy from a breeder to meet the parents in person, visit the home and see how and where the puppies are being kept, and ask for all health certifications and veterinary records for the puppies and breeding dogs. If the breeder refuses to comply, always contact the SPCA with your concerns.

Due to the inhumane conditions, many of the dogs are undergoing slow, careful behavior training and socialization. The SPCA has reached out to Cavalier Rescue USA Northern CA, Western Region to help with the five most traumatized dogs who will require long-term training to recover from the neglect they endured. Two dogs, a 3 year old red and white female and a 5 year old red and white male, will be available for adoption today and a third, a two year old red male, will be available later this weekend.

This is the seventh major rescue since July 2012, and in these seven cases alone the SPCA has rescued 221 pets and discovered 113 deceased kittens. The SPCA is not a chapter of any other organization and does not receive tax funding. All these rescues are made possible by the generosity of our donors.

 SPCA Rescues 22 Cats From Salinas Hoarder

How you can help

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News Coverage

For the sixth time during the past year, and the second time this week, the SPCA for Monterey County rescued neglected pets from an animal hoarder. This case, on October 23,  involved 22 cats from a house in Salinas.

SPCA Humane Officers rescued 22 adult cats from a woman living on Santa Clara Avenue in Salinas. The cats range in ages from six months old to adult.  They will be screened and assessed by SPCA veterinary staff for a variety of health and behavior issues commonly found with animals forced to endure these unsafe and squalid conditions by their hoarders. Their long road to treatment and recovery will begin right away, now that they are safe at the SPCA and receiving compassionate care from staff.

In addition to the SPCA, the Salinas Police Department, Code Enforcement, Adult Protective Services and Social Services are also involved in this case. The house has been deemed uninhabitable by Code Enforcement Officers for a number of violations.

Since July 2012, 212 pets have been rescued by the SPCA for Monterey County from horrific hoarding situations. The SPCA is not a chapter of any other organization and does not receive tax funding. All these rescues are made possible by the generosity of our donors.

How you can help

Donate to help rescue more animals in need
Buy gifts on Amazon for pets rescued by the SPCA
Report animal cruelty and neglect. All reports are confidential

SPCA Rescues 30 Neglected Dog and Puppies From Hoarder in Soledad

 How you can help

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Report animal cruelty and neglect. All reports are confidential

News Coverage:

On Saturday, October 19, the SPCA for Monterey County received a call from Soledad Animal Control requesting assistance with a suspected hoarding case on Ticino St. in Soledad. Upon arriving at the scene, SPCA Humane Officers discovered numerous dogs and puppies in horrific conditions.

Due to the dilapidated and extremely cluttered conditions of the house, the rescue effort took two days, with 11 dogs and ten puppies rescued on Saturday. After Humane Officers secured a search warrant, they were able to rescue nine additional dogs.

The house was cluttered to the ceiling with furniture, trash, boxes and garbage.  In order to move throughout the house, rescuers had to walk sideways through narrow, hazardous walkways.  Inside the house,  surfaces were covered in feces, urine, animal hair and spider webs.  An overwhelming smell of ammonia and feces permeated the home.  Hundreds of rats and mice were also seen living in the squalid house.

The rescued dogs are Shih tzus, chihuahuas, and rat terriers. Many are matted, covered in feces and urine and are displaying health issues consistent with hoarding and neglect cases including severe matting, very long and untrimmed nails, and severe skin issues related to flea infestations.  All of the pets will receive a complete veterinary exam and begin treatment immediately. 

This is the fifth large-scale rescue performed recently by your local, independent SPCA. These five operations resulted in the rescue of 190 pets during just those cases alone. 

SPCA Humane Investigations officers are still investigating and will likely submit this case to the Monterey County Office of the District Attorney for their consideration of multiple counts of animal abuse under the California State Penal Code. 

Learn more about animal hoarding.

How you can help

Donate to help rescue more animals in need
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SPCA Rescues Dozens of Cats and Kittens From House in Greenfield

 

 How you can help

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Buy gifts on Amazon for pets rescued by the SPCA

Report animal cruelty and neglect. All reports are confidential

 

On Thursday, September 5, the SPCA for Monterey County executed a warrant and rescued over 30 cats and kittens from a house on 6th Street in Greenfield. The surviving cats and kittens are currently undergoing emergency medical evaluation and treatment at the SPCA.

The house where the cats were kept is covered in feces. The odor of urine is so strong you can easily smell it from outside the house. The rescued cats are underweight and suffering from upper respiratory infections and ear mites.

This is the fourth large-scale rescue performed recently by your local, independent SPCA. Other recent cases include:

  • Seaside Cat Hoarding, July 2012: 51 adult cats, 113 deceased kittens. Successful conviction.
  • Monterey Animal Hoarding, April 2013: 22 cats, 24 dogs, 7 puppies. Owner pled guilty to charges.
  • St.. Francis All Creature Rescue & Sanctuary, June 2013: 17 dogs, cats, birds, kittens. Charges have been filed.

 The SPCA for Monterey County rescued 151 pets just during these rescues alone. The SPCA is not a chapter of any other organization and does not receive tax funding. All these rescues are made possible by the generosity of our donors.

SPCA Humane Investigations officers are still investigating and will likely submit this case to the Monterey County Office of the District Attorney for their consideration of multiple counts of animal abuse under the California State Penal Code. 

Learn more about animal hoarding.

How you can help

Donate to help rescue more animals in need
Buy gifts on Amazon for pets rescued by the SPCA

Puppies Abandoned near Little Caesar’s Pizza in Salinas, SPCA Offers Reward

The SPCA for Monterey County is offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who abandoned five young puppies near the Little Caesar’s Pizza on Sanborn Road in Salinas on or around Friday, August 2nd.

On August 2nd, SPCA Humane Investigations Officers responded to a call about five puppies abandoned in a fenced-in area full of trash and hazards near 45 S. Sanborn Road in Salinas. The puppies had not been seen there previously and they had no access to food or water.

The puppies, who the SPCA named Olive, Bell, Basil, Pesto, and Arti, are recovering at the SPCA and will be available for adoption soon.

Once caught, their owner could be charged with the following offenses: California Penal Code Sections 597.1 (Permitting Animals to Go Without Care), Penal Code 597 (Animal Cruelty), Penal Code 597(b) (Deprivation of Food, Water, and Shelter), and Penal Code 597s (Abandonment).

How you can help

 

SPCA Seeks Information on Neglected, Abandoned Dog

The SPCA for Monterey County is offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons who abandoned a severely neglected dog on Boronda Road, just outside Salinas, on or around Thursday, June 27.

Yesterday, the SPCA rescued a small grey shih tzu mix from a reclamation ditch near 105 Boronda Road. The small dog, who the SPCA called Ronda, was severely matted and covered in foxtails with painfully raw paws and chronic dermatitis. She was completely blind, suffering from severe arthritis in her back, and painful infections. She had obviously been bred many times and suffered an old untreated fractured jaw that healed incorrectly. It appears the neglect has been occurring for quite some time. The SPCA believes she was likely deliberately abandoned in this area as it is a location that is difficult to access for a small dog without vision and the fur on her face was recently trimmed.

Due to the severity of the neglect, we had to end Ronda’s suffering today. A veterinarian made the difficult decision because of a wide variety of painful, conditions that all could have been stopped long ago with proper care. Rest assured she was comfortable during her 24 hours with us. We removed her painful mats, gave her long overdue medication and a warm bath, and she spent the night snuggled in the laps of a loving foster family. Now – with your help – we are focused on finding the person responsible for causing her so much pain. We are so sorry for the sad ending to her story. Please know that we treated her with compassion and love until the end. Thank you all for your caring and support.

If caught, her owner could be charged with the following offenses: California Penal Code Sections 597.1 (Permitting Animals to Go Without Care), Penal Code 597 (Animal Cruelty), Penal Code 597(b) (Deprivation of Food, Water, and Shelter), and Penal Code 597s (Abandonment). In addition, there are local ordinances regarding the number of litters an owner is allowed to produce without a permit.

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SPCA Seizes Neglected Pets from Animal Rescue 

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News Coverage:

Update 7/22/14:

Monterey County District Attorney Dean D. Flippo announced today that his office, along with the District Attorneys of Fresno County, Contra Costa County, and Tulare County, settled their civil case against animal hoarder Crystal Kisicki and St. Francis All Creature Rescue and Sanctuary. The terms of the agreement provide for a statewide permanent injunction and require Kisicki to comply with probation requirements from her criminal case and pay the SPCA for Monterey County restitution as awarded by the criminal court.

The defendants agreed to a permanent injunction that bars Kisicki from possessing or “rescuing” any animal, selling or adopting out animals, working or interacting with animals, and adopting or procuring any animal from any animal shelter, pound, pet store, individual, Craigslist or any other online site, or from any other source. The permanent injunction also prohibits St. Francis All Creature Rescue and Sanctuary and Crystal Kisicki from starting up or working with another animal rescue group and soliciting potential adopters or monetary donors. St. Francis All Creature Rescue and Sanctuary and Crystal Kisicki are also required to remove any web pages and profiles they used to solicit donations or display animals.

Update 1/23/14:

On January 17, Crystal Kisicki pled no contest to charges of animal cruelty.  She was sentenced to serve 10 days in county jail, probation, and is under orders not to own any animals with the exception of three dogs she currently has.  Those dogs must be microchipped for positive identification, and she must submit a progress report to the courts every three months from a licensed veterinarian regarding the health and care of the three dogs.  

Original Story:

On Saturday, June 15, The SPCA for Monterey County rescued 17 neglected animals, including 14 dogs and puppies, 1 kitten, and 2 birds, from a woman claiming to run a rescue group and adopting them at PetSmart in Sand City.

The woman, Crystal Kisicki, runs St. Francis All Creature Rescue and Sanctuary.. Kisicki uses multiple addresses and P.O. boxes throughout the state of California, including San Ramon, Squaw Valley, and Dunlap. Please donate to help.

Because many addresses are in the Fresno area, we contacted the CCSPCA in Fresno for assistance. On June 19, they seized 61 neglected animals from Kisicki’s property in Squaw Valley.

The initial report to the SPCA came from a victim who had adopted a puppy from Kisicki at Petco in Monterey. The puppy suffered from scabies and fleas and was very thin. The victim paid $500 for the puppy. A second victim had also adopted a puppy from Kisicki at Petco in Monterey. He believed he was adopting an 8 week old puppy, but vets aged the dog at 8 months. The dog suffered from pustules, alopecia, and an overall skin infection. The victim and his wife both believe they contracted scabies from their dog.

The dogs and puppies range in age from 12 weeks to four years old, and were all thin. They are being treated for parasites and painful skin infections. The birds were very hungry, housed inhumanely, and suffering from feather loss. Kisicki was unable to provide SPCA humane officers with proof of vaccinations for any of the animals.

The SPCA is concerned there are additional adopted animals that are in need of veterinary treatment, as well as owners who may be in need of medical treatment. If you believe you adopted a pet from Kisicki, please contact the SPCA at 831-373-2631.

Always report animal cruelty and neglect when you see something that does not look right, even if the person claims to be a rescue group. We strongly advise against adopting or purchasing animals if the seller will not allow you to see where the animals are kept and cannot provide veterinary records.

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SPCA Rescues 48 Animals from Horrific Hoarding Conditions

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Update 5/10/13:
Many of the pets rescued from a horrific hoarding situation in Monterey are available for adoption into new loving homes.

Early in the morning on April 28, SPCA for Monterey County Humane Officers and the Monterey Police Department rescued 48 animals from a residence in Monterey.  During the following week, SPCA officers rescued five additional cats and found the remains of two cats and one small dog. The house where the animals were being kept was three feet deep in garbage, urine, and feces.

The total number of rescued pets is now 22 cats, 24 dogs, and 7 young puppies. The house has been declared uninhabitable by the City of Monterey.

Update 5/8/13: From Monterey Police Department
On April 27, 2013, Monterey Officers initiated an investigation into animal cruelty at 1290 First Street in Monterey. During the course of the investigation over 48 dogs and cats were taken into protective custody and housed at the SPCA.

Detectives completed their investigation and requested a warrant for the resident.  The resident has been identified as Ilagene “Jeanie” Quaglia, a 59 year old female who lived by herself at that address.

Quaglia was arrested without incident today at her workplace, 686 Lighthouse, Monterey. She was booked at the Monterey City Jail on the warrant for animal cruelty and will be transported to the Monterey County Jail to be held in lieu of $10,000 bail. Quaglia is facing new charge of animal cruelty as a cat was located locked in the trunk of her vehicle when she was arrested.

Update 5/1/13:
Yesterday, SPCA for Monterey County Humane Officers and the Monterey Police Department returned to serve a search warrant at the location where 48 animals had been rescued last Sunday.  The warrant was based on an anonymous report that cats were still hidden within the uninhabitable buildings.  SPCA officers rescued two additional cats and found the remains of two cats and one small dog.

The total number of rescued pets is now 19 cats, 24 dogs, and 7 young puppies. The house has been declared uninhabitable by the City of Monterey.

Original New Release:
On April 28 the SPCA for Monterey County rescued 17 cats, 24 dogs, and 7 young puppies from a horrific hoarding situation in Monterey.

SPCA Humane Officers and skilled staff members responded to the scene at 1:00 am after receiving a call for assistance from City of Monterey Police Department. SPCA staff worked diligently until 9:00 am that morning rescuing the scared dogs and cats and brought them to the safety of the SPCA to provide much needed medical examinations, vaccinations, flea treatments, food, water, and care.

The rescued pets suffered from flea infestations, eye infections, painful dental infections, and skin infections. Many of the dogs are covered in painful mats, urine stains, and fecal matter due to the inhumane conditions in which they were being kept. Most of the rescued animals are emaciated.

The cats and dogs are now safe and are being treated for their illnesses and enjoying fresh food, clean water, and comfortable living conditions in addition to compassionate care from SPCA staff.

No information is currently available on the owner. The house where the animals were being kept was three feet deep in garbage, urine, and feces, and has been declared uninhabitable by the City of Monterey.

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News Coverage

SPCA Rescues Abandoned Puppies and Dogs

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On February 9, the SPCA for Monterey County rescued six newborn puppies and three adult dogs that had been abandoned following an eviction in Salinas.  The owner of the dogs has not yet come forward.

The dogs and puppies were found at 822 Del Monte Ave. in Salinas. When the landlord inspected the property following the eviction, he found the dogs and newborn puppies locked inside a small shed. The tiny puppies were hidden in the shed inside a cardboard box with trash and debris on top. No food or water was available.

The dogs’ owner has not responded to SPCA post-seizure hearing notices or letters requesting she surrender the animals to the SPCA.

The case will be submitted to the Monterey County Office of the District Attorney next week. The owner could be charged with the following offenses: California Penal Code Sections 597.1 (Permitting Animals to go Without Veterinary Care), Penal Code 597 (Animal Cruelty), Penal Code 597(b) (Deprivation of Food, Water, and Shelter), and Penal Code 597s (Abandonment).

The dogs include an adult Chihuahua named Butter, an adult poodle named Crumpet, the puppies’ mother, a small terrier named Dora, and the six puppies, who the SPCA has named Charlie, Linus, Patty, Violet, Lucy, and Sally.

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SPCA Rescues 51 Cats, Discovers Remains of Numerous Kittens

On July 24, 2012, the SPCA for Monterey County rescued 51 cats from two properties in Seaside occupied by a woman and her adult daughter. September 11, the daughter pled not guilty to three felony PC597(b) counts of cruelty to animals and three misdemeanor PC597.1(a) charges of animal neglect. The mother pled not guilty to three misdemeanor PC 597.1(a) charges of animal neglect. The next court date is scheduled for October 3rd.

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News Coverage

Charges were filed after SPCA for Monterey County seized 51 cats from a house in Seaside on July 24. The SPCA also discovered 113 deceased kittens in that property and another nearby apartment rented by a member of the same family. The heartbreaking story received international attention.

Since the rescue, four cats underwent emergency surgery at the SPCA for pyometra, a severe infection of the uterus that is fatal if left untreated.  Three of the cats with pyometra suffered E. coli infections in their uteruses. The test results for the fourth cat are pending. Sadly, despite emergency medical care, one of the 51 rescued cats had to be humanely euthanized due to severe, incurable sepsis. A second cat suffered a rapid and unexpected decline of health and needed to be humanely euthanized. A third cat died of unknown causes. Necropsies are pending.

The remaining rescued cats are showing improvement. The majority of the cats are living in two large colony rooms filled with fresh air, natural sunlight, and numerous gifts generously donated from compassionate people around the world. The donated cat trees, beds, toys, and supplies are helping teach the rescued cats to play and relax. Every day the SPCA sees more cats coming out of hiding and wanting to be brushed or petted. Video available: www.bit.ly/spca-cats.

The SPCA had originally received reports that some of the cats may have been taken from local streets and may have owners looking for them. To date, no matches have been made.

To learn how you can help, put your name on a list of potential adopters, or report animal cruelty, please contact The SPCA at 831-373-2631.  All calls are confidential.  To donate to the care and medical treatment of these cats and to help with the SPCA’s rescue efforts, please call The SPCA or donate online at www.SPCAmc.org.

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Rescued Dog Available for Adoption, Owner Receives Jail Time and Probation

Update: Bono has been adopted!

A very sweet rescued dog is now available for adoption at the SPCA. Bono may be a rock star now, but he came from a heartbreaking past, as evidenced by his three little legs.

Warning: the following paragraph contains information that may be disurbing.
Last month, the SPCA received a report from a concerned citizen in Soledad who had seen a matted and dirty dog that looked like “its leg was falling off”.  SPCA Humane Officers responded to the scene and found a small, dirty dog whose right front leg was purple and black and had bone protruding through the matted fur.  The owners stated that he injured his leg a month previously, that they were treating it themselves, and that they had not taken the dog to a vet.

When humane officers returned to the SPCA with Bono, he was rushed into emergency amputation surgery due to the severe injury and infection. He was also anemic due to a severe flea infestation.

On August 9, Bono’s former owner pled guilty at her arraignment.  She was put on 3 years’ probation and cannot possess any animals during this time.  She was also sentenced to 20 days in jail, beginning 9/7.  Restitution fines were ordered but a hearing has not yet been scheduled. 

In addition, Bono’s owners surrendered four dogs and four puppies that had been born that morning. The dogs were unlicensed, unvaccinated, matted, and suffering from anemia due to flea infestations.  The puppies were also flea infested, extremely cold, and outside exposed to the elements. One puppy had dirt and mud around his mouth and was struggling to breathe.

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SPCA Rescues Neglected Horses – Guilty Verdict in Case

A south Monterey County man has been found guilty of failure to care for his animals after the SPCA for Monterey County rescued six emaciated horses and discovered one dead horse on his property.

Armando Chavez, 41, of San Lucas was found guilty of one count of 597.1 PC – Permitting animals to go without care, on Wednesday after a jury trial. Chavez remains in custody at the Monterey County Jail with no bail until his sentencing hearing on April 25.

The case came to light when an anonymous witness called the SPCA in January 2011 to report that the dead horse and the other horses were in a field on the Lockwood-San Lucas Road. There was no food available in the pasture where the horses were found.

SPCA Humane Officers seized the emaciated horses and found the remains of another horse on the property.  The day after the seizure, Humane Officers drove to Chavez’s ranch in South County to inquire about the horses.  SPCA Humane Officers had a previous history with Chavez in regards horses kept on his property.  After questioning, Chavez admitted that the six horses seized belonged to him and he had recently moved them to the pasture on Lockwood-San Lucas Road.

Five of the horses, Nutmeg, Star, Aspen, Cloud, and Duke were nursed back to health and adopted into new homes. One horse, Sedona, had to be humanely euthanized due to chronic painful laminitis.

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SPCA Rescues Emaciated Former Police Dog

The SPCA for Monterey County rescued a severely emaciated German shepherd. The dog was previously a police K9 officer and belonged to a former Watsonville police officer. The District Attorney’s Office recently filed charges against the suspect, Francisco Ibarra. Ibarra pleaded not guilty to both charges in a Monterey County court. Ibarra is representing himself in the case and is due back in court June 19 for a pre-trial hearing.

The five year old dog was found at the Salinas residence of former police officer Francisco Ibarra. The dog’s hips and ribs were prominently showing and there was no food in the backyard. SPCA Humane Officers seized the dog on February 17 after giving Ibarra a 24 hours’ notice to contact the SPCA and receiving no response.

The emaciated and dehydrated dog, later identified as former K9 officer Ingo, was immediately evaluated by a Veterinarian who gave him 1 body condition score. The canine Body Condition Score chart goes from 1-5 with 1 being emaciated, 3 considered ideal, and 5 being obese. A score of 1 reflects that ribs, lumbar vertebrae, pelvic bones and all body prominences are evident from a distance; no discernible body fat; and obvious absence of muscle mass.

X-rays revealed Ingo’s stomach was filled with what appeared to be sand or dirt. The next day he passed pieces of green plastic, dirt, sand, hair, and grass.  He is slowly recovering and gaining weight on a specialized diet on a prescribed feeding schedule.

There does not appear to be a medical reason for his emaciation. At his time of rescue in March he weighed 55 lbs. An average adult male German shepherd of his size should weigh 80 to 90 pounds.  As of May 1st, he weighs 80 pounds.

To report animal cruelty and neglect, please contact the SPCA at 831-373-2631. All calls are confidential.  To donate to help animals like Ingo, please call the SPCA or donate online.

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News Coverage

SPCA Offers Reward for Information about Abandoned Puppies Update: All the puppies have been adopted

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In November, seven puppies were rescued by SPCA Humane Officers on November 16. Those puppies, Grover, Elmo, Bert, Ernie, Lily, Zoe, and Felix blossomed under the SPCA’s care. (http://www.youtube.com/user/TheSPCA) and have since been adopted. Their story has tugged at people’s heartstrings and the list of potential adopters quickly grew to over 100 names long. The puppies have since been adopted. No suspect was located.

When they were rescued, the puppies were approximately 2 ½ months old, hungry, dehydrated, flea-infested, and suffering from foxtails and worms when they were rescued.  Tire tracks found on the property led Humane Officers to believe that the suspect drove to the fence line and tossed the puppies over.

If you have any information about this case, please contact The SPCA at 831-373-2631 or 422-4721 x213.  All calls are completely confidential.  To learn how you can help, report animal cruelty and neglect, or donate to help rescue animals please call the SPCA or donate online at www.SPCAmc.org.

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News Coverage

SPCA Rescues 73 Animals from Hoarder in Castroville

The SPCA for Monterey County rescued 28 rabbits, three dogs, one newborn puppy, 19 doves, and 22 chickens from an inhumane and unsanitary situation in Castroville on Thursday, May 26.

SPCA Humane Officers were responding to a call on a nearby property when they discovered a house with pets kept in small cages.  Upon investigation, SPCA Humane Officers found that the animals were in feces-filled cages, most with no food or water.  In instances where the pets had water available to them, the water was filthy and undrinkable.

To learn how you can help, put your name on a list of potential adopters, or report animal cruelty, please contact The SPCA at 831-373-2631.  To donate to the care and medical treatment of the rescued animals, please call The SPCA or donate online.

News Coverage:

5/27/2011 – Salinas Californian animal rescue slideshow

5/26/2011 – KSBW news story “More Than 70 Animals Found In Castroville Home”

Click to view additional photos. Warning: Some photos are disturbing.

Click to view additional photos. Warning: Some photos are disturbing.

SPCA Rescues 41 Cats from Hoarder in Southern Monterey County

On Thursday, March 17, nine days after rescuing 29 cats and kittens from a hoarder in Southern Monterey County, SPCA Humane Investigators returned to the scene with a search warrant following investigative efforts that led us to believe additional cats were hidden on the property. 

SPCA Humane Officers found and seized 12 additional cats and two dogs.  A deceased cat was also discovered on the property.

Click to view additional photos. Warning: Some photos are disturbing.

As with the earlier case, the 12 cats were discovered in horrific conditions in one of the old, dilapidated camper trailers that had been thoroughly searched and cleared of cats during the prior investigation on March 8th.

After the rescue, the cats and dogs were brought to the SPCA shelter where SPCA staff worked late into the evening to give each cat vaccinations and a thorough medical evaluation.  The majority of the cats are suffering from upper respiratory infections.  They are now being treated for their illnesses and enjoying fresh food, clean water, and comfortable bedding.

The property where the cats were found had no electricity or water.  The situation was originally discovered by the Monterey County Sheriff’s Code Enforcement Officers.  This multi-agency collaboration also included Adult Protective Services.

SPCA Humane Investigations officers will be filing charges with the District Attorney’s Office against the hoarder for multiple counts of animal abuse under the California State Penal Code. 

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SPCA for Monterey County Issues Warning and Reward: Man Practicing Veterinary Medicine without License in California

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Updated 2/3:

Thanks to the generous support of our concerned community plus an additional $500 from the Santa Cruz SPCA (all SPCAs are independent and not chapters of each other) the reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of Damian Maldonado is now up to $5,000. The SPCA for Monterey County originally offered a $1,000 reward in this case.

Maldonado is described as a Hispanic adult male, approximately 32 years old, weighing 200-210 lbs, and 5’8” to 5’10” in height.  His business card states that he operates “El Cartel Bully Kennels” and provides veterinary medical services.  He offers the following services, many of which are illegal without a veterinary license: general consultations, vaccinations, deworming, general surgeries, supplements, accessories, vitamins, artificial insemination, stud services, and puppy sales.

The SPCA has now found four canine victims of a man falsely representing himself as a licensed Veterinarian. The SPCA is also seeking information about a potential fifth victim, a Doberman puppy found four weeks ago.

Two pit bull puppies, known as Frankie and Anna, have since been adopted.  A third pit bull puppy received licensed vet care and is still with his owner. The fourth puppy, a Doberman pinscher, is now on pain medication and antibiotics and recovering at his owner’s home.

The pit bull puppies were surrendered to the SPCA on Friday, January 21 after their owner, a Soledad resident, hired Maldonado to crop the ears on three of his puppies.  Maldonado charged the owner $100 per puppy to perform the procedure in the owner’s backyard on a makeshift table using fishing line as suture material. 

The Doberman puppy’s illegal surgery was performed in the owner’s Salinas living room on a plastic folding table.  Maldonado placed sticks 1 ½ to 2” inside the puppy’s ear canal to hold the puppy’s ear up, sewed the cuts with fishing line, and wrapped tape directly on the open wounds.  Licensed Veterinarians noted that the ears were not cropped by a trained vet, that there was not enough ear cartilage left to support the ears correctly, and that the tail was cropped too closely to the puppy’s body. 

If apprehended, Maldonado could be charged with violation of the Drug Enforcement Administration regulations, practicing veterinary medicine without a license, and a variety of Penal Code violations for cruelty to animals.

If you have any information about this case or if you and your pet have been victims of Maldonado, please contact The SPCA at 831-373-2631 or 422-4721 x213 or report online.  All reports are completely confidential.

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News Coverage

 

openLillyBefore_2Severely Matted Stray Dog Rescued by SPCA
Update: Lily was adopted!

On April 16th, The SPCA rescued a severely matted stray dog. The dog, named Lily by SPCA staff, was found sleeping on Broadway Avenue near Luzern Street in Seaside. She was immediately brought to The SPCA shelter for care.

Lily, a six year old miniature poodle mix, was thin and severely matted. As you can see from these photos, she was so matted that her eyes and paws were not visible. Her paws were so matted that we could not feel her feet at all – it was as if she was wearing multiple pairs of very thick winter socks.

From the moment Lily arrived at The SPCA, she was very loving and quick to give kisses to anyone who came close. She was not microchipped and did not have an ID tag. No owner has come forward to find her.

During examination, SPCA Veterinarian Carol Iida found that Lily had cataracts and a large dermal mass that was left untreated. The severe lack of grooming left both these conditions practically invisible under all the tangled hair.

Lily Before and After

Lily Before and After

Lily was quickly groomed and turned from a matted cream-colored dog into an adorable, sparkling-white poodle. Dr. Iida removed the dermal mass during her spay surgery, and although she was still sporting a few stitches, Lily was quickly adopted. Special thanks to Jessica Paquelier, Mid-Valley Pet Spa, for donating grooming services.

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A Heartwarming Reunion at the SPCA

On Thursday, May 14th, a heartwarming reunion took place at The SPCA for Monterey County between a rescued mare and the former owner who for years has regretted selling her.

Mesa, a 19 year old Quarter horse mare, was rescued in September 2008 from a neglectful owner. Mesa was approximately 300 lbs underweight, her feet were in very poor condition, and she had a young foal by her side.

The owner was unable to meet the conditions required to reclaim her.

Mesa’s foal was adopted on April 9, but Mesa was still waiting for a new home. The SPCA faced a challenge finding a new lifelong home for Mesa, an older, unrideable horse.

Meanwhile, Mesa’s former owner, Tracie Greco of Eagle Mountain, UT, had been regretting selling her ever since 2005. “I’ve always tried to keep in touch with the people that I’ve sold horses to,” says Greco. “I guess Mesa was the ‘one that got away’.” One day, while browsing horse ads online, she came across The SPCA’s ad for Mesa and knew it had to be her former horse.

“It breaks my heart to know Mesa was treated so poorly after she left me,” says Greco. “I’m so grateful that The SPCA saved her. Now I need to get her back home where she belongs.”

The SPCA is waiving Mesa’s adoption fee and they look forward to hearing stories about Mesa’s life in Utah.

“Unfortunately, this can happen when you sell any animal,” says Gary Tiscornia, SPCA Executive Director. “Many horse owners, at least subconsciously, prefer not to know what became of their old horses. We are thrilled that Tracie never stopped looking for Mesa and we are honored to be a part of this poignant reunion.”

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SPCA’S Commitment

Each day, SPCA Humane Officers can receive reports and investigate cases of:

  • Animal poisoning
  • Malicious & intentional maiming
  • Deprivation of food, shelter or water
  • Cockfights
  • Organized dog fights
  • Permitting animals to live without proper care and attention
  • Animal abandonment
  • Other violations of State Humane Codes

If you have concerns about an animal that is being neglected or cruelly treated, call our Humane Investigations Department at (831) 373-2631, or 422-4721 ext. 213 or click the link below to submit your report online. All reports are confidential.

Our Mission

Our mission is to assure compassionate and humane treatment of all animals in our community.